Singapore En-Bloc Flats

Standing for Selective En-Bloc Redevelopment Scheme, the SERS was first launched in 1995 by HDB (Housing and Development Board). The objective is to select flats in the older housing estates, usually more than 25 years old, for redevelopment purposes. Residents of the selected flats are usually compensated at market values and given priorities in the new replacement flats nearby.

There are four main groups of public housings in Singapore, namely HDB, SIT (Singapore Improvement Trust), JTC (Jurong Town Corporation) and HUDC (Housing and Urban Development Company (HUDC) Private Limited).

When HDB was established in 1960, it gradually took over the role of SIT in providing affordable public housings for Singaporeans. JTC was started in 1969 for the industrialisation of Jurong, and the management of its flats were handed over to HDB in 1982. HUDC was kicked off in 1974 for the middle income families but was phased out by 1982. In the same year in which the SERS was launched, HDB also announced the privatisation plans for HUDC flats.

As of 2013, more than 70 sites have been announced for SERS, with hundreds of flats demolished in the past 18 years.

2014

Dakota Crescent (to be updated)

The rustic and peaceful Dakota Crescent estate, existed since 1958, was officially announced in July 2014 as one of the planned sites for future redevelopment. The 400 residents were expected to move out by 2016.

dakota crescent

2011

Redhill Close (Block 1-3, 5-22)

The Redhill Close flats, or commonly known as chek lau (seven-storey in Hokkien), were built in 1955 by SIT. Started as rental flats, they were built to accommodate the lower income families living at Bukit Merah. Designed with trapezoid roofs and curved facades, the flats retained a colonial flavour in the pre-independence days.

Many families have lived at their Redhill Close homes for decades. The 21 blocks of SIT flats are expected to be emptied by 2017, much to the displeasure of its residents.

redhill close3

East Coast Road (Block 1-3)

The four low-rise flats at East Coast Road, the only public housing in this vicinity, were built by the HDB in 1962 for the resettlement of the villagers who lost their homes in a big fire at Siglap.

As East Coast was developed to be a prime area filled with landed properties and condominiums, it became obvious that the 50-year-old flats had to go sooner or later. In November 2011, the East Coast Road flats were placed under the SERS list.

east coast road block2

2008

Commonwealth Drive (Block 74-80)

The famous zhup lau chu (10-storey buildings) at Tanglin Halt, built in 1962 and once featured on the back of the 1-dollar note of the Orchid series, were announced as a SERS site in August 2008. By late 2013, most of the flats, shops and eateries were emptied.

In 2014, another 31 blocks in the Tanglin Halt vicinity were also announced for SERS.

tanglin halt chup lau4

2007

Silat Road, Kampong Bahru Hill, Silat Walk (Block 17-19, 22-31)

Built in the 1950s by SIT, such low-rise Art Deco-styled flats had become rare in a modern Singapore; the other similar ones still existing are located at Tanglin Halt.

silat road en bloc flats

Henderson Road (Block 94, 96)

henderson road en-bloc flats

henderson road en-bloc flats3

henderson road en-bloc flats2

henderson road en-bloc flats4

Teban Gardens Road (Block 2-11)

teban gardens en-bloc flats

The blocks of flats at Teban Gardens Road were among the first public housings to be built by HDB in the Jurong East and West Coast vicinities. Before its construction, this area was a large mangrove swamp that extended from Sungei Pandan. It took years of land reclamation to fill up the swamp and extend the coastline.

teban gardens en-bloc flats2

In 1964, JTC established the small housing estate of Taman Jurong, and quickly followed were Boon Lay Gardens, Teban Gardens and Pandan Gardens in the early seventies. The Teban Gardens flats, however, were built by HDB in 1978 after development plans for a Jurong East New Town were drawn.

teban gardens en-bloc flats3

teban gardens en-bloc flats4

The ten blocks of flats at Teban Gardens were vacated by early 2013. Almost all the residents have shifted after getting their SERS notice as early as 2007.

teban gardens en-bloc flats5

teban gardens en-bloc flats6

Clementi Avenue 1 (Block 401-404, 407-409)

clementi avenue 1 en-bloc flats

clementi avenue 1 en-bloc flats2

clementi avenue 1 en-bloc flats3

clementi avenue 1 en-bloc flats4

clementi avenue 1 en-bloc flats5

2006

Ang Mo Kio Avenue 1 (Block 247-252)

In the late seventies, the standard concrete slab block design of HDB flats were duplicated in new towns such as Ang Mo Kio, Clementi and Bedok.

ang mo kio street 21 en bloc flats

Each housing district is usually made up of a cluster of slab blocks with two-, three- and four-room units and one or two point blocks of five-room units. The standardised aluminum door grilles, window panes and double-stepped doorways at each unit lined up along a common corridor were common features found at these flats.

ang mo kio street 21 en bloc flats2

ang mo kio street 21 en bloc flats3

Table-tennis tables, badminton courts and basketball courts were common sport facilities within the housing estates. In between the blocks, there was even a field for the elderly to play a sport similar to croquet or gateball.

ang mo kio street 21 en bloc flats4

ang mo kio street 21 en bloc flats5

ang mo kio street 21 en bloc flats6

Ghim Moh Road (Block 9-112, 9A, 12A)

The construction of the long Commonwealth Avenue West in 1977 had improved the accessibility between the housing estates of Buona Vista, Dover, Ghim Moh and Clementi greatly. By then, the Ghim Moh flats were newly completed, providing housing needs for the residents working at the western side of Singapore.

ghim moh estate3

Zion Road (Block 88-92)

The huge curved bluish flat (Block 92) at the junction of Havelock Road and Zion Road had been an iconic landmark since its completion in 1973. It had witnessed the decline of the Great World Amusement Park in 1978 and the rise of the Great World City in 1997.

zion road blue flats

Yung Ping, Yuan Kuang Road (Block 5-10)

The flats at Yung Ping/Yung Kuang Road were some of the remaining JTC flats in Singapore. An unique aspect was the common lift system shared between two blocks of flats.

yung kuang road JTC flats

2005

Upper Boon Keng Road (Block 20)

The large L-shaped Block 20 of Upper Boon Keng Road was originally one of the two blocks of flats, the other being Block 19, standing near the busy junction of Sim Avenue and Sim Way. Built in 1975, the 30-year-old block was designed with red-bricked sides and distinguished levels in its facade. In November 2005, it was announced as a SERS site, and was emptied by 2012.

upper boon keng road en bloc flat

upper boon keng road en bloc flat2

upper boon keng road en bloc flat3

Sim Drive (Block 54, 56, 57, 59, 60, 62)

The flats at Sim Drive belonged to a quiet peaceful neighbourhood for the past 30 years, sandwiched between parcels of industrial estates along Aljunied Road and Kallang Way. In November 2005, six Sim Drive blocks, numbered 54, 56, 57, 59, 60 and 62, were announced for SERS. Curiously, Block 55, standing between Block 54 and 56, was left out.

sim drive en bloc flats

sim drive en bloc flats2

sim drive en bloc flats3

sim drive en bloc flats4

Clementi Avenue 3 (Block 445)

The Clementi Town Centre has been undergoing a transformation in recent years, and it is inevitable that the older buildings are to be replaced by newer ones. Block 445, one of the low-rise flats in the vicinity that were built in 1980, was selected for SERS in March 2005. By 2012, the area was cordoned off, ready for demolition.

old clementi town centre2

Commonwealth Avenue (Block 27A)

Built in 1972, the block of 27A stood at an convenient location directly opposite of the Queenstown MRT Station. The eighties was arguably its golden era, as it was part of a self-sufficient Queenstown estate with cinemas, library, supermarket, schools and community centre. Like its neighbour, the Margaret Drive Block 6C, it was demolished between 2011 and 2012.

queenstown old flat

2005

Holland Drive/Avenue (Block 14-17, 22, 23)

holland drive en-bloc flats

2004

Dover Road (Block 30-32, 34-39)

It took only a few weeks for the Dover Road housing estate to turn from a busy neighbourhood with crowd-filled kopitiams and hawker centre into a ghost town. By the end of 2010, the flats had became vacated. Two years after its abandonment, the estate came to life again with the units put up for rental for the foreign students.

dover estate

2003

Toa Payoh Lorong 5/6 (Block 28, 30, 32, 33)

In January 2003, four aging blocks of flats at Toa Payoh Lorong 5 and 6 were chosen for SERS. Built in 1969, the most famous block in recent years was perhaps the one with the iconic dragon playground standing in front of it.

toa payoh lorong5-6 flats

toa payoh lorong5-6 flats2

One by one, the twelve shops and kopitiam at Block 30 ceased their operations in 2006. Two years later, residents began to move out; some of them were relocated to their new flats at Toa Payoh Lorong 2 and Jalan Tenteram.

toa payoh lorong5-6 flats3

Some of the units were then temporarily used as dormitories for the foreigners working at the Sentosa Resort World when it was first started. By mid-2013, the four blocks of mostly three-room units were finally emptied.

toa payoh lorong5-6 flats4

toa payoh lorong5-6 flats5

The iconic dragon playground, though, becomes a hot topic of debate recently, as it is the only original sand-based dragon playground left in Singapore (the other three are either smaller dragons or rubber-mat type). Many have expressed support for the preservation of the old playgrounds that had given precious childhood memories to the previous generation of Singaporeans.

toa payoh lorong5-6 flats6

Havelock Road and Taman Ho Swee (Block 29, 31, 33)

The three blocks of 29, 31 and 33 at Havelock Road and Taman Ho Swee had been listed for SERS since February 2003, but it was only a decade later before the demolition started.

Interestingly, Block 29, 31 and 33 were the only odd-numbered blocks at Havelock Road. The remaining blocks, all even-numbered, are clustered at the stretch nearer to Lower Delta Road.

havelock road and taman ho swee en bloc flats

The slab block of 29 of Havelock Road was perhaps the most eye-catching flat along the driveway, with its facade designed with alternative squarish blocks painted in green, yellow and white. It also stood beside Isetan Office Building, which houses the popular Havelock Road branch of Ah Hua Bak Kut Teh.

havelock road and taman ho swee en bloc flats2

havelock road and taman ho swee en bloc flats3

The en-bloc Taman Ho Swee blocks stood on a small hill behind Block 29. Even though the three blocks were located close to each other, Block 31 and 33 were named after Taman Ho Swee, a short road off Jalan Bukit Ho Swee.

All three blocks in the vicinity, as well as some of the nearby flats, were built in the late sixties to accommodate the residents who lost their homes in the fires that plagued Bukit Ho Swee in 1961 and 1968.

havelock road and taman ho swee en bloc flats5

havelock road and taman ho swee en bloc flats4

One of the designs of public flats at Bukit Ho Swee in the late sixties and early seventies include a long narrow corridor with units facing each other, creating a gloomy and suffocating surrounding. This unpopular design was discontinued in the designs of public housing years later.

havelock road and taman ho swee en bloc flats6

havelock road and taman ho swee en bloc flats7

2001

Seletar West Farmway 6 (Block 1, 2, 5-7)

In the seventies, the HDB built several small housing estates, known as Rural Centres, in different rural areas of Singapore to resettle the farmers. One of them was the Jalan Kayu Rural Centre. The flats in these rural centres were generally three- to four- storey tall, and consisted of retail shops, hawker centre and wet market to provide self-sufficient means for the residents.

The region around Seletar West Farmway had witnessed rapid development in the nineties. By the new millennium, other nearby farmways were already incorporated into the new towns of Sengkang and Punggol. Likewise, the flats at Seletar West Farmway were due to be demolished, but due to changes in the redevelopment plans, they were re-used as foreign worker dormitories instead.

seletar west farmway en bloc flats

1998

Lim Chu Kang Road (Neo Tiew) (Block 3-5)

Like the Jalan Kayu Rural Centre, the Neo Tiew housing estate was another rural centre built by the HDB in the seventies. Also known as the Lim Chu Kang Rural Centre, there were three blocks of low-rise flats in the vicinity, completed with shops, playground, hawker centre and market.

In October 1998, the blocks were listed for SERS. By 2002, most of the residents had moved out; many of them took up their priorities to the new flats at Jurong West. The abandoned estate was later taken over by SAF for their FIBUA (Fighting in Built-Up Areas) training exercises.

neo tiew estate7

1995

Strathmore Avenue (Forfar House)

The iconic 14-storey Forfar House at Strathmore Avenue was the first public housing to be announced for SERS. Built in 1956, the SIT block was named after Royal Borough of Forfar, the hometown of Queen Elizabeth’s mother. When completed, it was the tallest building in Queenstown, and many local nicknamed it as “zhap si lau” (fourteen storey). In later times, the flat also gained a notorious reputation as a suicide block.

Today, its site is occupied by the 40-storey Forfar Heights.

For other announced SERS sites between 1995 and the current year, please refer to the official HDB InfoWEB.

Also read From Villages to Flats (Part 2): Public Housing in Singapore for a brief history of SIT, JTC and HDB flats.

Published: 04 April 2013

Updated: 26 July 2014

46 Responses to Singapore En-Bloc Flats

  1. Yap Chong Chieh says:

    This is really a great article! I also have a habit of spotting these old flats, which forms part of my childhood memory of Singapore. Sometimes it can be sad to see these flats torn away. Personally, I had many wonderful memories at my aunt’s place at Boon Tiong Road, the very first series of flats selected for en-bloc redevelopment.

    Why not also trace private condominiums that are demolished / to be demolished? That will be interesting also.

  2. Louc says:

    Hi, I love this article as it reminds me of the old block I used to stay at before it was torn down. But I noticed that the article section on Margaret Drive blocks are kind of inaccurate. The 2nd picture of the HDB block was actually Blk 39A, not Blk 6C. I believe the 1st picture should be same as well. Would you please amend? Thank you.

    • Hi, you are right. I’ve checked the map and it was Block 39A indeed

      It’s strange that this block, and also Block 39 and 40, was not listed under SERS program but all three were demolished

  3. Just like the demolished blocks at Queen’s Close

  4. Lav says:

    Look! It’s BLK 20 Upper Boon Keng Road!
    I’ve always fancy this block and it’s my favourite of all because of it’s very unique shape and it’s so big, wide and had long corridors! Too bad now it’s gone…
    Not my website but do check out the latest 38 pictures here

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/84671320@N02/with/9579127708/

    P.S I’m 10 and have been reading remembersingapore and it’s one of my favourite websites as it teaches me many history things and things that we might overlook as Singapore makes changes every day! (:

  5. Lester says:

    Hope you can include a section on Rochor Centre, which is one of the first HDB residential development to be built with a commercial podium below. Also, Blk 5 Geylang Square and Blk 6 Upper Boon Keng Road were blocks built with factories at levels 1 and 2. Very unique and believed to be the only ones built. These two blocks were demolished in 2000 and 2009 (approximate) respectively.

  6. reduakari says:

    No one talks about lorong limau block 78 and 79 one room rented flats.

    • Mark says:

      Yes, while taking a stroll to Whampoa to see the ‘Dragon” water fountain (fill with grass instead of water now) near Blk 85, I saw that these 2 blocks were already gone (by June 2013 maybe). The site is readying for new construction now. The flats there should hailed from the early 1970’s, and there’s a 24hr NTUC Fairprice branch at Blk 80.

  7. Mark says:

    Just took a stroll along the en-bloc flats of Blk 28/30/32/33 at Toa Payoh Lorong 5/6 this past midnight. Saw that Blk 33 is in the process of been cordoned off with green mesh nets. A heavy vehicle is parked at the carpark behind Blk 32 too. The corridor lights of a whole section of Blk 32 (L-shaped) had gone out.

    • Mark says:

      Went back to the SERS site above past midnight. Blk 30/32/33 were largely cordoned off. But if you’re nimble enough, one can still step over the orange coloured nets to take a closer look; else one can entered via the pavement near the dragon playground/Blk 28.
      The lights at Blk 30/32/33 were totally shut-off, throwing these parts into total silence & darkness, save for the lights beaming in from the main road, from the full moon shining overhead, and the muted buzz from crickets’ calls. Parts of the adjointing carpark were sealed off too, awaiting demolition. As for the grand old trees lining the vicinity (covered with ferns, vines and having trunks’ diameters at above 1m), one wonders if they’ll still be standing when the flats are gone?
      One cannot help but feel like it’s akin to witnessing the life support system being taken off from a terminally ill patient, with loved ones keeping vigil till death claims the body and soul of the departed.
      The unearthly stillness & calm behind Blk 30, as well as in the park beside Blk 33 after nightfall should make for a spook-tecular spot for Halloween. Scare fans should seriously hurry as preparation for demolition is proceeding rapidly. Blk 33 is already covered up with blue mesh nets.
      The final countdown will eventually reach Blk 28 & the dragon playground. Soon these iconic landmarks will ceased to be around for drivers entering/leaving Toa Payoh via PIE.

      • Mark says:

        Do anyone still recall the Adrian Lim child ritual murders of early 1981? According to Wikipedia, the crime scene was at a corner unit on 7th floor of Blk 12, Toa Payoh Lorong 7. Adrian & his two ‘holy’ wives were staying there when the murders of the two young kids took place.
        I tracked down the unit earlier this month. If this was the correct spot, it’s currently being occupied by a group of Indian FW’s. Hardly any locals will opt to stay in a unit with such a tragic past.
        With the 25th anniversary of the execution of those found guilty approaching (Nov 1988), Blk 12/13 are still standing tall, since 1970. Some of the surrounding blocks that were standing in 1981 had already made way for the new Blks 10/11/14 since the late 90’s.

      • simplyatrocious says:

        I noticed certain ground floor units of Blk 28/32 allows a glimspe into the interior – windows opened, main door (ajar), metal grille gate (locked). One can make out the arched doorway into the kitchen, and then what seems like a back door at the end.

      • simplyatrocious says:

        The erection of hoardings is reaching Blk 28. Based on the boundary marked out, it seemed that the dragon playground will be spared (for now). It also appeared that the all the blocks will be ‘wrapped-up’ first before proceeding with actual demolition.

  8. Mark says:

    I also passed by the en-bloc flats along Clementi Avenue 1 Blks 401 to 404 and 407 to 409 (announced for SERS on 28 Jun 2007 as per HDB InfoWEB). The premises had already been vacated. As for Blk 445 it’d been demolished by early 2013 I think. The old Empress cinema was gone as well. A water fountain stood where Cityvibe (“Jin-Man-Di”-the smaller mall beside Clementi Mall) is standing now..I believe it was demolished by the mid-noughties to make way for construction. I was reminded of it from another old photo of AMK Emporium in the 1970’s.

    • Mark says:

      Just to clarify, as of this date Clementi Blk 445 is just starting to be cordoned off for demolition. The current construction site to its right side coming out from interchange seemed to be on a patch of land that was empty previously.
      Blk 436-438 (SERS 28 Mar 2005) were already gone, with the demolition site now covered with earth.
      Blk 311-314 (SERS 12 Aug 2000): Ongoing new construction for HDB.on original site.

      While the cookie cutter old flats at Clementi is not as iconic as those at Zion Rd or Taman Jurong, their final fate is a reminder that (in S’pore at least) change and progress is ever present and unstoppable.

  9. Mark says:

    A number of old private condominiums/housing had made way for new developments in recent years.IMO, the collective memory factor will never be felt as strongly as those for public housing and other amenities enjoyed by the masse. The value in remembering this particular class of buildings lies in their design and exterior facade, which tells the story of the era when they first came into being. A lot of them are beautiful and unique in appearance, examples of which are found along Farrer/Holland Road area. The older ones should hail from the 1970/80’s, and might had featured in old SBC/TCS shows =).

    Will we or our younger generations be feeling such nostagia when current/upcoming developments make way for further waves of urban renewal in future decades?

    • With lesser freehold properties launched, I guess we will see more en-bloc programs in the future (even existing freeholds are not immune to en-bloc or government acquisition).

      As for HDB, most of them are 99-year lease, so they are even more prone to en-bloc after 30 years or so.

      • simplyatrocious says:

        It appeared that the main ‘look’ of private residential properties completed since the late 2000’s is that of glass & metal with minimal concrete – sleek, impressive but somehow soul-less, like a robot. Certain older properties look dated, lacking in features but exudes personality. Leong Bee Court (1986) – enbloc & demolished during Q2 2013, has a strong angular facade. It sits along Upper Serangoon Road towards Potong Pasir MRT. It’s neighbour Woodsville Mansion (1987) is still standing. The facade has smooth rounded corners, i.e. for the units’ balconies. Similarly, the design & look of HDB flats evolves with each decade.

  10. Ridzuan says:

    Hye there… im working as a meter reader in sin singapore power. .. some of those blocks u mention above were enbloc and some of it were reopen as rental flats I guess.. like sims drive blk 54 sims drv was once vacant and reopened back 2013 I guess.. its gd to see these flats not demolish.:)

  11. simplyatrocious says:

    Ghim Moh Road (Blocks 9 to 12, 9A and 12A) [HDB SERS: 8 Dec 2006] is currently undergoing demolition. As of now, Blk 9A had been knocked down till the last 3 floors, while Blk 9 was totally concealed by grey safety screen nets. Hoardings erected had sealed off the entire perimeter of the blocks and carpark. The main entrance affords some last few glances within the site whenever it’s open for access to demoliton workers and vehicles. The entire walkway linking the Buona Vista MRT underpass to the affected site will be closed off to pedestrians from 30 Oct 2013, as per pasted notices. The ‘garden’ facing Blk 12A is so overgrown with vegetation that it looks like a secret garden of sorts. In these last moments one can sit on the available wrought iron benches to savour the quiet & silent nature while time stood still. A decade ago, I was here during flag day; right now the heavily tarnished external facade of the blocks says ‘slum neighbourhood’ instead, as compared to other SERS comrades which looked dignified and less neglected. Across Ghim Moh Road, the sleepy, laid back pace of life goes on. Scarce pedestrians dotted the market area around Blk 20/21, as evening peak hour roars on at the MRT station. The brown/grey coloured facade of these surviving flats (Blk 6/7 etc) and the clock tower of Ulu Pandan CC helps add flavor to the ‘forgotten enclave’ vibe of the place. Lastly, a throwback to ‘Old Kampong’ as an old lady is still selling newspapers & stuff in a dimly-lit, make shift wooden ‘store’ in between the MRT station & underpass (in use from Nov ’88 – by PWD).

  12. simplyatrocious says:

    PS: The below info deviates from the topic of HDB flats that had gone under SERS, but it still ties in to the theme of good old places about to be gone for good;

    Demolition Updates:
    1. Where: The row of shophouses (since pre-war?) along Upper Serangoon Road (towards city; after Potong Pasir MRT station) and Jackson Centre.
    When: Demolished by end-Q2 2013.
    What (was hot): Jackson Centre had some great eats..seafood anyone?
    Now: New launches of private residences (Sennett Residences & Sant Ritz) ,and Venue, an upcoming commercial/ retail development.

    2. Where: 943-951 Serangoon Road, which is 2 blocks of 3-storey shophouses/living units, the row of terraced houses behind each above mentioned block (943D-J; 945D-K).
    When: As of now, erection of hoardings around the entire site’s perimeter is almost completed. Vacated since early Apr 2013. Also featured long, external spiral staircases.
    The neighbouring Ng Song Kwee Garden (plant nursery) had been demolished during Q2
    2013; the latter’s site is now an empty grass patch. (The former premises’ image is still visible on Google Map).
    What (was hot): Two Muslim food outlets (Adam’s Corner & Yassim’s Restaurant) operated from late night till dawn daily, serving supper to workers who just ended work and for late night gatherings (the night life factor).
    Now: Unknown. The adjointing empty field that’s opposite Blk 11 Saint George’s Road has a “STATE LAND” signage.

    3. Where: Old Admin Block, NUS (beside Central Library, leading to Arts’ Faculty). Actual name is ‘BLOCK ADMIN’.
    When: As of now, erection of hoardings around the entire site’s perimeter is in process. Site cordoned off since 14 Oct 2013.
    What (was hot): Not sure of its earliest history, but the 8-storey building should exist
    since Kent Ridge Campus was in use from early 1980’s. Was this the first Admin Block before the office shifted to Engineering and later to its current site overlooking NUS Sport’s field?
    NUS is no stranger to A&A/ upgrading works to its interior & facade over the years. However this is one rare instance where such a conspicious landmark being totally demolished and
    redeveloped.
    Now: Refer to 4th paragraph, Page 2 of document http://alumnet.nus.edu.sg/president-
    letter/2013-02.pdf

    • Yes, I was quite shocked when they decided to tear down the shophouses along Upper Serangoon Road, near its junction with MacPherson Road. Never expected it


      (Photo source: Google Maps)

      • simplyatrocious says:

        Demolition Updates:
        8. Teban Gardens Blk 2-11: Passed by & saw the SERS site being enclosed by green wire perimeter fence. Maybe there’re alternative plans for the site?

        9. (a) Holland Drive Blk 14-17, 22-23: Blk 14-17 have being demolished. The 2 point blocks of 22-23 are being prepared for demolition by having the units’ glass windows removed. An observation is that the notice description at the demolition site’s entrance stipulated that expected completion date was Dec 2012. Maybe the schedule had been pushed back to allow residents more time to shift out?
        (b) Buona Vista Swimming Complex will be permenently closed IN Feb 2014, according to the notice at the entrance. Patrons will be diverted to nearby locations at Queenstown or Clementi. These are all part of the plan to redevelop the Holland Village area in the coming years. For e.g., the current blk 18A-C & MSCP (completed in 2012) stood at where Blk 18 & 19 (SERS/5 Dec 1996) used to be.

        10. Zion Road flats: Currently Blks 89-91 were already gone; Blk 92 was demolished till the 6th floor and Blk 88 was in the midst of being wrapped up for demolition.

        11. Boon Lay Drive Blks 180, 181, 182, 184: The flats were long gone; the replacement flats (Blk 182, 183A-C) are kind of ready for residents to shift in. It seemed that this site’s progress is quite advanced, in terms of initial demolition to construction of new flats, despite barely 8 years passed since the site was placed under SERS (22 Mar 2006).

        12. Boon Lay Avenue Blks 216, 217, 219, 220: The demolition work was only recently completed. Debris was almost cleared up.

    • simplyatrocious says:

      Demolition Updates:
      4. Clementi Blk 445 was totally demolished by 30 Nov 2013.
      5. Clementi Blk 401-404, 407-409 might commence with demolition during early 2014. The adjointing carpark had been cordoned off from 26 Nov 2013. Blk 405 (1-rm units) & 406 (2-rm units) are accessible. Some units are still being occupied in Blk 406 (i.e. 11/12 floors). Peeping thru the open window grills,the empty units are totally bare with cement flooring. The electric/gas meters have also being dismantled. Some former residents have shifted to Casa Clementi across the road? Clementi swimming complex looked un-ultilised on a weekday evening.
      6.Sims Drive Blk 59 was already gone; Blk 57 & 60 was ‘wrapped up’ & ready for demolition. Blk 54/55/56 are still occupied (as rental units?), while their ground floor surroundings & the whole Blk 62 looked truly desolate, save for some commuters passing by, and some old men chatting in the dark seated down.
      7. Ang Mo Kio Blk 250-252 were already gone. The site will see the erection of 2 26/28 level flats (Kebun Baru Court) to be completed by early 2017. Life goes on at blks 244-249. Blk 259 – the clover shaped building still look exclusive, sited on a lush, quiet neighbourhood.
      Item 2 in my last update – the St George demolition site was totally reduced to rubble as of 13 Dec 2013.
      I also notice that the locality map showing bus routes at bus interchanges have been updated as of latter 2013 from the last one as of late 2011. Certain upcoming developments (some formerly SERS sites) will be depicted as ‘U/C’ on the updated map.

  13. Path Light says:

    When did Queen’s close of Block 1 to 22 demolished?

  14. sgparlay says:

    anyone has any info of the HDB flats at Boat Quay (where the Clarke Quay Central is located today) in the 70s and 80s?

  15. F.B says:

    Good thing now, ang mo kio ave 1, is for rent. but the place kinda “ulu” .. :)

  16. hollow says:

    My aunt used to live at the top level of blk 28 in toa payoh during the 70s to early 80s. I’ve stayed over a few times and played in that iconic dragon playground with my cousins. Back in the 70s most of my aunties and uncles (families were huge) lived in toa payoh. It was a new town with many young families. I went back recently to try to take some photos of the zig zag block and the playground before its demolished but I was too late, the block has been cordoned off and soon that playground that was listed as one of the best in the world will go with it.

    Goodbye an old friend, thanks for the great memories.

  17. List update: Addition of en-bloc flats at Clementi Avenue 1. The flats are now empty and awaiting for demolition

  18. Notes says:

    Tenders For Demolition of Teban Gardens Blk 2 To 11 was call on 23 May 2014

    • Thanks for the update :)

      I passed by the flats today, and saw the area fenced up. Thought they will be refurbished as rental flats for the foreigners

      • YY says:

        Heavy construction equipment has been moved into the carparks next to blocks 4-6 and blocks 1-3. The windows were being dismantled already. It’s going to be a long slow process.

  19. Ras says:

    I used to stay at Clementi Ave 1 block 409 , its i moved there at 2004 and left at 2012 . miss those moment staying there. Block 407 was used to film The Lion Men local film few months back !

  20. chua kie ian says:

    List Update : Tanglin Halt Road estate selected for SERS. For more details, do visit the following website : http://www.hdb.gov.sg/fi10/fi10329p.nsf/w/eSERSLatestSite4?OpenDocument

  21. Andrew Lum says:

    how do i share a photo? blk 33, 31 demolished already.

  22. ashlyn says:

    Anyone knows where did the residents of blk 28 toa payoh have been shifted to?

  23. Rosslee says:

    Anyone from old block 80 toa payoh?got photos to share?I missed my old block so dearly during the 80’s

  24. Dennis Gordon says:

    Block 58 Geylang Bahru had a very sad crime in 1979, is the building still there? Whoever had committed the murder will never rest in peace. May the souls of the faithful departed rest in peace.

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